Not My Demo-graph



Case Study |

@extra_judicial


Copyrighted Logo with Pictogram

Subliminal Stimuli is used to confront your cognitive awareness & associate danger at the same moment.  

2008, I saw this very messy street kid on the sidewalk at a Skytrain station coming towards me. He was also moving sideways across my field of view and his eyes and face were scarlet.

I realize now it was a mimic ploy, to elicit shame in my appearance. At that time I was 50 years old, struggling with sciatica, and severe muscle tension brought on from a car accident. My mode of walking would be described as desperate, getting from railing-to-bench so to speak.

My as-yet life-long un-diagnosed allergy to sulfites had been growing more acute year by year. It's in all kinds of foods and products naturally and as an additive. Some of the symptoms were apparent to others and not to me, and some the other way around. I could offer no explanation about my face and coughing, and doubly vulnerable from the spine injury.

So back to this kid, the guards, the authorities, saying nothing but planning harm. I had more immediate things to concentrate on than a hand full of unfamiliar elements.  

So much professional cognitive bias. Facial recognition and the ability to read intent was just around the corner had so much promise.


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Transit Report Blog
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civics | Supported by our readers



 

Not My Demo-graph



Case Study |

@extra_judicial


Copyrighted Logo with Pictogram

Subliminal Stimuli is used to confront your cognitive awareness & associate danger at the same moment.  

2008, I saw this very messy street kid on the sidewalk at a Skytrain station coming towards me. He was also moving sideways across my field of view and his eyes and face were scarlet.

I realize now it was a mimic ploy, to elicit shame in my appearance. At that time I was 50 years old, struggling with sciatica, and severe muscle tension brought on from a car accident. My mode of walking would be described as desperate, getting from railing-to-bench so to speak.

My as-yet life-long un-diagnosed allergy to sulfites had been growing more acute year by year. It's in all kinds of foods and products naturally and as an additive. Some of the symptoms were apparent to others and not to me, and some the other way around. I could offer no explanation about my face and coughing, and doubly vulnerable from the spine injury.

So back to this kid, the guards, the authorities, saying nothing but planning harm. I had more immediate things to concentrate on than a hand full of unfamiliar elements.  

So much professional cognitive bias. Facial recognition and the ability to read intent was just around the corner had so much promise.


Subscribe to the newsletter notifications to updates of this article.


Transit Report Blog
hidden
civics | Supported by our readers